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The Top 5 Most Common Eye Disease

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Most people have eye problems at one time or another. Some are minor and will go away on their own, or are easy to treat at home. Others need a specialist’s care.

Whether your vision isn’t what it used to be, or never was that great, there are things you can do to get your eye health back on track.

See if any of these common problems sound familiar. And always check with a doctor if your symptoms are really bad or don’t clear up within a few days.

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EYESTRAIN

Anyone who reads for hours, works at a computer, or drives long distances knows about this one. It happens when you overuse your eyes. They get tired and need to rest, just like any other part of your body.

If your eyes feel strained, give them some time off. If they’re still weary after a few days, check with your doctor to make sure it isn’t another problem.

Dry Eyes

This happens when your eyes can't make enough good-quality tears. You might feel like something is in your eye or like it’s burning. Rarely, in severe cases, extreme dryness can lead to some loss of vision.

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Glaucoma

Your eye is like a tire: Some pressure inside it is normal and safe. But levels that are too high can damage your optic nerve. Glaucoma is the name for a group of diseases that cause this condition.

A common form is primary open angle glaucoma. Most people who have it don’t have early symptoms or pain. So it's important to keep up with your regular eye exams.

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Presbyopia

This happens when you lose the ability, despite good distance vision, to clearly see close objects and small print.

After age 40 or so, you may have to hold a book or other reading material farther away from your eyes to make it easier to read. Sort of like your arms are too short.

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Floaters

These are tiny spots or specks that float across your field of vision. Most people notice them in well-lit rooms or outdoors on a bright day.

Floaters are usually normal, but they sometimes can be a sign of a more serious eye problem, like retinal detachment. That’s when the retina at the back of your eye separates from the layer underneath. When this happens, you might also see light flashes along with the floaters or a dark shadow come across the edge of your sight.

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